Expedition Tales

  • Roadtrip Reports: Arches

    Arches-Feathered-Friends-Journal

    “For a little while we are again able to see, as the child sees, a world of marvels.” Edward Abbey

    In 1956 and 1957 Edward Abbey was the park ranger for Arches, at a time before it had achieved National Park status and when the unpaved roads were more traveled by tumbleweeds and lizards than visitors. Now, the park is visited by 1.5 million people each year.

    Even with this incredible number of visitors, Arches retains its sense of awe and wonder. Of all the parks I visited, I saw more people here who were simply standing, observing, and marveling. You know you are somewhere special when a child’s expression of awe at the 290-foot expanse of Landscape Arch is mirrored on the face of the adults beside them.

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  • Roadtrip Reports: Escalante

    Escalante, Boulder Airport sign with Eos jacket

    A bright blue fuselage sticks out of the sand and sagebrush, adorned with the words “Boulder Airport and UFO Landing site.”

    After hiking through sagebrush, stunted pines, and a light drizzle I finally arrived at the blue structure I spotted in the distance miles before. The man-made monolith is one of the many gems waiting to be found by intrepid visitors to the Escalante National Monument in Utah.

    The Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument was created in 1996 by Bill Clinton and encompasses 1.9 million acres of land. To put that in perspective, the monument is slightly larger than the entire state of Delaware. As a National Monument, the land is managed by the BLM (Bureau of Land Management) and is protected from many forms of development and use (but not all) and is open to more recreational activities than National Parks.

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  • Spring Hiking in the Southwest: 5 Pro Tips

    Escalante Twisty Road

    Last month one of our staff members road tripped through the southwest. Here are five of her tips on how to make the most of your adventure.

    1. Layer, layer, layer.

    Springtime means unpredictable weather. When the sun was out I happily stolled along in short sleeves and sunglasses. When clouds, rain, snow, or nightfall rolled in, however, I had to be ready to layer up quickly. My go-to pieces of gear were a thin pair of wool gloves, a wind shirt, a hooded quarter-zip base layer (I now want hoods on everything), and my down Eos jacket.

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  • Memorial Day Sale!

    It’s that time of the year… to gear up for your summer adventures!

    Memorial Day Sale Image- Hiker in mountains

    Our in-store Memorial Day Sale starts on May 19, and goes through May 30th.

    Whether you are going on your first backpacking trip or preparing for Mount Rainier, our sale and clearance items will help you get out there and send your adventure.

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  • Roadtrip Reports: Bryce Canyon

    Bryce Canyon National Park Watercolor Painting

    Part One: A Feathered Friends Tour of the Southwest

    Hoodoos. Ladies with hairdos. Fairy Chimneys. Whatever you call them, the incredible rock formations of Bryce Canyon are unlike anything else in the world. The towering spires, vibrant colors, and chromatic vistas were the first stop in a road trip to celebrate the National Park Centennial.

    Last month I went on a month-long road trip to explore the parks that are arguably one of “America’s best ideas” in relation to conservation and recreation. It was also the perfect opportunity to put some new Feathered Friends gear to the test in a cold and arid climate.

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